Blog

20Jul
20Jul

Army Road Marching Tips

0 Comments| Posted in h By Kelly Mason

Army Road Marching Tips

 

“An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.”


― Benjamin Franklin

 

Key Points:

Limit your carrying load.

Don’t allow yourself to overheat.

Hydrate

Take care of your feet.

 

Travel Light:

The lighter you pack for the field the more comfortable you will be on road marches.  As a general rule, I recommend that you bring 40 pounds or less in clothing and equipment.  Another rule of thumb is to keep your carrying load ratio at 20% of your body weight or less.  As I provide this advice remember that it doesn’t include body armor, carrying weapons, loading up on ammunition and possibly strapping on a radio.  All of this equipment only increases your carrying load as well as your misery index.  With this in mind, it is wise to travel as light as possible.  Typically, those who fall out on road marches tend to carry too much weight.

Don’t Overheat:


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22Jun
22Jun

US Army Field Training Tips

0 Comments| Posted in h By Bill McKinney

Field Training Tips

 

          After completing basic training back in 1982, I was sent to Babenhausen Germany. Only 2 weeks after arriving in Germany my company was sent to the Grafenwoehr Training Area. This happened in the heart of winter, the weather was cold and wet, and I wasn’t fully prepared for this 30-day training exercise. Anyone who has experienced a “Winter Graf” knows what probably took place for a complete rookie. At first I made many mistakes, and I had to learn the hard way. I’m writing this article on field training tips to help you avoid the most common mistakes that many young soldiers tend to make. Take note, I that didn’t say all mistakes only the most common.

          Keep in mind that my information is targeted at light infantry soldiers, and those who are required to live out of a rucksack. A significant amount of what I have to say will be irrelevant for soldiers who have the luxury of traveling on vehicles or sleeping in tents at night. Whereas those who work with heavy equipment and self-propelled vehicles will want to bring more clothing, equipment and personal comfort items, soldiers in light units will want to pack much lighter. Nonetheless, all soldiers will want to have a proactive game plan before going to the field. Remember that an ounce of prevention is better than a pound of cure. Therefore, it’s wise to take some proactive measures while you are packing your bags and rucksack. Here are some of the tips I’m going to elaborate on.

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17Mar
17Mar

Military Enlistment Tips

0 Comments| Posted in h By Kelly Mason

Military Enlistment Tips

- Enlisting in the military is a huge commitment. It’s a major life-altering decision.

- Perform extensive research BEFORE speaking with a recruiter.

- Speak with your family first. - Speak with former soldiers for advice.

- Familiarize yourself with commonly used military acronyms, jargon and slang before enlisting.

- Start with the end in mind.

- Concentrate on education, technology and secondary languages.

- Seek a MOS or work profession that will transfer well into the civilian sector.

- Understand many military jobs, training, equipment and technology often does not transfer well into the civilian sector.

- Fully understand what you want and set specific goals before you speak to a recruiter.

- You should go to college first.

- You should enlist for the shortest period possible.

- Understand that recruiters are highly trained salespeople.

- Only speak with a recruiter in the presence of friends and family.

- Give your ASVAB and Physical Fitness testing your best effort.

- Don’t assume anything will take place after you enlist.

- Get all promises and negotiated issues in writing.

- Delay the process, and don’t allow yourself to be pressured.

- Read all paperwork at home before signing anything. Allow yourself a cool down period.

- After signing any paperwork keep and safeguard all copies.

       Enlisting in the military is a huge commitment. If you want to excel as a professional soldier it will require commitment and sacrifice. Therefore, you need to understand what you are sacrificing before you enlist, and you need to understand you are preparing to make a huge commitment.

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17Mar
17Mar

The Necessity for Ft. Drum

0 Comments| Posted in h By Scott MacPherson

Fort Drum Banner

Last year our political leaders put out a message that it intended to reduce our nation’s active duty soldiers from about 570,000 to 490,000 troops. In March of 2015, the local community of Northern New York rallied at the State Office Building in Watertown NY to protest against any troop reductions at Ft. Drum. The rally was unsuccessful, and the 10th Mountain Division scheduled the inactivation of the 3rd Brigade Combat Team. This translates into a loss of about 1,500 soldiers when combined with other unit increases.

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05Feb
05Feb

Welcome to Fort Drum

0 Comments| Posted in h By Kelly Mason

Welcome to Ft. Drum


From the Locals of the North Country



            So you are coming to Ft. Drum in the near future? Well welcome to Northern New York! I have more good news, there’s a good chance you’re going to love it! The greater Ft. Drum region has much to offer you. Allow me to list some of the attractions you will enjoy:

  • Major Tourist Attractions
  • City Attractions
  • Night Life
  • Fine Dining
  • Unique Cultural Experiences
  • Education Opportunities
  • Rural Attractions
  • Seasonal Fun
  • Outdoorsman Activities
  • Sports Activities
  • Wholesome Local Traditions
  • Modern Military Facilities



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28Jan
28Jan

The Jerry Can

0 Comments| Posted in h By Kelly Mason

THE JERRY CAN



           As some of you know, I am a former NCO/SFC in the US Army. That is one of the major reason I love working at Bradleys’. I am still taking care of soldiers and looking out for their well being an also serving our great civilian customers Recently we added a new product to our store; the 5 liter, 10 liter, and 20 liter Jerry can.

 

           I have so many fond memories of my use of the Jerry Can during my time in the service. One of my duties was driving the Jeep.



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26Nov
26Nov

Take Care of Our Soldiers: Part II

0 Comments| Posted in h By Kelly Mason

“Without the brave efforts of all the soldiers, sailors, airmen, and marines and their families, this Nation, along with our allies around the world, would not stand so boldly, shine so brightly and live so freely.”

-Lane Evans

 

“I may be compelled to face danger, but never fear it, and while our soldiers can stand and fight, I can stand and feed and nurse them.”

 

-Clara Barton

“Every American soldier wants as much public support as he can possibly have. We fight better knowing that our people back home support us, back us, and understand what we're doing. It's hugely important.”

-John Abizaid

 

Take Care of Soldiers Part II

           In my last article I expressed there is a very real need to protect our soldiers from any source that seeks to exploit our sons and daughters for economic gain. I pointed out examples of how our government can erode a soldier’s personal income by allowing underfunded mandates and inflation to take place. I provided one example of how local law enforcement has targeted soldiers in the past using ticketing as a source of revenue. I provided several examples of how predatory companies target soldiers using unscrupulous business practices, and how parasitic individuals often look at soldiers as an easy mark.

          As I brought up this disturbing information I also went on to state there’s no need to become overly cynical. Although there are dark forces that try to prey on our soldiers, there are significantly more people and organizations that are looking out for the troops. I suggested that AUSA (Association of the United States Army) and the private companies that support this noble cause is a good example that demonstrates how much people care. Allow me to expand my thoughts about AUSA and how it benefits the average soldier.

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28Oct
28Oct

Take Care of our Soldiers

3 Comments| Posted in h By William McKinney

Take Care of Soldiers

 

Part I


Over the last 3 decades I have witnessed the US Army make great leaps and bounds at taking care of soldiers, Army families and the military community as a whole.  When I joined the Army in 1982, our motto was “Mission first people always.”  I can remember thinking the “mission first” part of the motto made perfect sense, but the “people always” part was a bit confusing.  What does “People always” really mean?   I thought the Army motto was an incomplete sentence that needed to be much more specific.  This explains why I liked Lieutenant Colonel Daniel J. Sullivan’s study called “Leadership and Taking Care of Soldiers.  What does it mean?”   I will confess that as s a small businessman that serves the military community I ask the very same question on a regular basis. 


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09Oct
09Oct

Tips on Carbon Lined Hunting Clothing

 

 

             When I served as a soldier in the US Army we were taught how to protect ourselves from Nuclear, Biological and Chemical weapons.  Today this is more commonly known as NBC training by the average soldier.  The main thing soldiers are required to do is to insulate their bodies using charcoal lined clothing, gas masks and rubber gloves and boots. We were taught charcoal lined clothing would seal or protect us from harmful gases. 

 

             Since NBC clothing can seal off harmful gases, it didn’t take long for people to realize that it would also reduce body odor from escaping into the air.  Eventually people realized that the principles of insulating our bodies from harmful NBC agents could also reduce our own body’s scents from animals.  In other words, if charcoal can keep gases out then why can’t it also keep gases in?  This mindset gave birth to carbon lined hunting clothing that achieved scent locked objectives.  Hunters realized charcoal lined clothing could lock in their body odor.

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18Sep
18Sep

Tips on Becoming a US Army Officer

2 Comments| Posted in h By William McKinney

I have written many military related blog articles over the years.  The common thread that links these articles together is that I have experience or a unique view on these subjects.  This explains why I will discuss the opportunity of becoming a US Army Commissioned Officer.  I have a unique story about how I became an Army Lieutenant, and I have witnessed many other future Officers pursue this goal.  With this in mind, I feel I may be of help to young adults seeking a military career.

 

Before I dive into this subject I will confess that I’m a product of the eighties and early nineties.  I recognize that much has changed since I was a ROTC cadet.  Therefore, I performed research and spoke with some current ROTC cadre members to update my knowledge on this subject.  Going this route proved to be wise because much has changed since my years as a soldier

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